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Contains photographs of the kublick Railroad station - History




Kublick


U.S. SEN. KIRK TOURS ILLINOIS ARMY NATIONAL GUARD FACILITY IN PEORIA

PEORIA – U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk joined Maj. Gen. Dennis Celletti of Springfield, the Assistant Adjutant General- Army of the Illinois National Guard, for a tour of the Illinois Army National Guard facility in Peoria March 26. The Peoria facility is home to eight Illinois Army National Guard units.

Kirk is a 22-year U.S. military veteran and is currently serving in the United States Naval Reserves as a intelligence officer. He was the first House member to serve in a war zone since 1942. Kirk has deployed to Afghanistan twice. He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate on Nov. 2010.

A new training facility is planned in Peoria with state-of-the-art training equipment and methods to ensure the Soldiers are always prepared.

U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Stephanie McCurry, Illinois National Guard Public Affairs/ Lt. Col. Randy Sikowski of Decatur, with Commander of, 1st Battalion, 106th Aviation Regiment in Peoria explains to Mark Kirk, U.S. Senator for Illinois, the current issues the Peoria Illinois Army National Guard facility is having. Kirk went on a tour of the facility March 26.

U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Stephanie McCurry, Illinois National Guard Public Affairs/ (Left) Chief Warrant Officer (2) Norman Brooks of Clinton, with Detachment 1, Company B, (Military Intelligence), 33rd Brigade Support Troop Battalion based in Peoria, listens as Maj. Gen. Dennis Celletti of Springfield, the Assistant Adjutant General- Army of the Illinois National Guard explains to Mark Kirk, U.S. Senator for Illinois some of the challenges the Peoria facility is facing with the out of date facility. Kirk went on a private tour of the Illinois Army National Guard’s Peoria facility March 26.

For high resolution photos, please contact the Illinois National Guard Public Affairs Office at [email protected]

Hurn is/was staff academies guy –

Ops for schols – service academies –

Peoria – roth – xa tea party roth – cwlp –

And see ing – Robert roth – legal –

Illinois connections already coming through

Peoria Journal Star, The: Blogs (IL) - Monday, January 12, 2009

Author: Andy Kravetz

Illinois connections already coming through

The senior senator from Illinois, Dick Durbin, sent out a press release last week about his meeting with the new head of the VA (okay, not yet but I can’t imagine Eric Shinseki wouldn’t get confirmed). What was their topic of discussion—” the need for a fully staffed VA Medical Center (VAMC) in Marion, language to finalize the merger of the North Chicago VA and the Great Lakes Naval Hospital, and collaboration with private rehabilitation facilities to treat veterans with traumatic brain injury.”

Yep, the coattails of the president-elect are likely to begin working pretty soon. Oh sure, Durbin had pull before. He’s the No. 2 senator but having Barack Obama as your buddy helps. Combine that with LaHood in as the Transportation Secretary and I full expect that veterans are going to be very well served in this community. Now, we aren’t going to be living on gold-paved streets but I think that if some ideas were on the bubble before, they have a much better chance of going through.

And a hearty congrats to Nate Hurn . The former LaHood staffer and veteran to boot served dozens upon dozens of people here in the district who needed help. He was the go-to man for veterans and for those needing help through the miltary maze. Now, he’s doing the same thing with U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock who replaced Ray. New twist, though, he’s a policy guy now as well. Meaning that a guy who has spent years helping people on the ground and who served in the armed forces is going to be helping guide Schock’s thoughts on the military. Super. Nate’s good people. Always good with the public and with the press. Nice man and I wish him all the best. With Schock’s star rising in the GOP, as evident by the dozens of TV interviews and his dismantling of Chris Matthews on MSNBC, you have to wonder if this isn’t the best time in years for Illinois politically. We’ll see.

Bernard Schoenburg: State trade official spends a lot of money on travel

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, February 26, 2009

U.S. Rep. AARON SCHOCK, R-Peoria, has opened a Springfield office at 235 S. Sixth St. That's a different location from the west-side office where his predecessor, U.S. Secretary of Transportation RAY LaHOOD, had his office in the capital city.

LaHood didn't seek re-election last year, and Schock won the job.

"This location is highly visible and easily accessible to residents who walk, drive or take public transportation," Schock said in a news release.

The office, on the northwest corner of Sixth and Monroe streets, is in the space that long ago was Allen's Cigar Store. More recently, it housed El Presidente Burritos.

CAROL MERNA

of Canton, Schock's district chief of staff, is overseeing Schock offices in Peoria, Jacksonville and Springfield. Merna also worked for both LaHood and his predecessor, then-U.S. House GOP Leader BOB MICHEL of Peoria.

"Even though they're very different men, they have wonderful leadership styles that are very similar," Merna said of Michel, LaHood and Schock. "Aaron cares a great deal about taking good care of the district, and that's why I'm here." She makes $90,000 annually.

The district offices employ seven people. Besides Merna, other top staffers –

Hurn, Peoria-based district office manager and veterans policy adviser, makes $50,000 annually.

Hinds is constituent services specialist in the Springfield office, and

Baker has the same title in the Jacksonville office. They each are paid $45,000 annually.

The full address of the Springfield office is at 235 S. Sixth St., Springfield, IL 62701. The phone number is 670-1653.

The Jacksonville office is at 209 W. State St., Jacksonville, IL 62650. The number is 245-1431.

Meanwhile, Schock's Washington-based communications director is

DAVE NATONSKI , 28, who earlier worked for then-U.S. Rep. CHRISTOPHER SHAYS, R-Conn.

Shays, who Natonski called "probably as moderate as you can get" as a Republican, was defeated for re-election last year.

"I saw a lot of similarities between my old boss and Aaron," Natonski said. "They're both very positive members of Congress." Among similarities, he said, is avoiding negative campaigning, being "forward-thinking" and seeking to work across party lines.

"Aaron is a great person to work for," Natonski said. "I really believe in his message. I really wanted to work for someone like him."

Natonski is paid $55,000 annually.

Natonski also has gotten a bit of press himself, which he downplays. A Washington publication called "The Hill" annually picks the "50 most beautiful" people working in the nation's capital. Both now-President Obama and Natonski made the top 10 that year.

"It's something they do," Natonski said. "There are a lot worse things than to make that list."

Sorry, ladies. He has a girlfriend.

Meanwhile, Schock was quite evident in the televised run-up to Obama's speech to a joint session of Congress Tuesday evening.

The congressman was near the entrance where Obama and other dignitaries entered the House chamber, so viewers got to see him a lot.

Natonski said Schock arrived early to get a good seat.

As the president entered, Natonski said, "Schock said, "Welcome, Mr. President,'" and Obama responded, "Good to see you, Aaron." On the way out, Schock told Obama, "Nice job, Mr. President," and Obama then thanked him, Natonski said.

Remembering Wayne Downing part 2

Peoria Journal Star, The: Blogs (IL) - Sunday, June 15, 2008

Author: Andy Kravetz

Remembering Wayne Downing part 2

Well, mission accomplished for the guys at Post 1111, the newest American Legion post in the area. When Bruce Bruner set out last year to establish a new post, he did it despite the declining numbers for the Legion across the United States. With the older veterans not so numerous, and the younger ones not feeling the urge to join, the Legion has taken a few hits.

Bruner saw an opportunity though. “We want to generate a new generation of American Legionaries. One of our missions is to educate our veterans, especially when they come back from Iraq,” he said, noting that at 52, he’s younger than the World War II and the Korean War veterans so the age gap might not be as severe.

So last November, the post started with 12 guys, Nov. 11, 2007, (get tithe idea where the Post number came from?) When it came time to decide who to name it after, there was only one person—the late Wayne A. Downing, a retired general whose credentials, frankly are too impressive to be listed here. Let’s just say the Special Operations community holds him in high regard, President Bush sought him for counter terrorism and President Clinton tapped him to head up the investigation into the bombing of two military dorms in the mid-1990s.

“Without a doubt, in my honest opinion, he was the only candidate. When we were talking about it, five people shouted out Wayne A. Downing. It’s only fitting. He was a Peoria Heights resident and we are a Peoria Heights post, and my God, he’s one of the most accomplished generals in our time. He was not famous, though,” Bruner said.

I might have to disagree with the Bruner, a former member of the 101st Airborne in the mid-1970s. Fans of MSNBC and NBC News saw him dozens of times during the initial phases of the Iraqi war giving analysis and commentary. He was featured several times in the pages of the Journal Star and well, let’s face it—most people couldn’t name more than five generals if you exclude Patton, Omar Bradley, George Washington, Grant and Sherman.

Saturday’s gala at Tower Park featured State Sen. Dave Kohler, Nate Hurn , an aide for Rep. Ray LaHood, and of course Downing’s family including his wife, Kathy, his mother and his sister Marlie. About 75 people attended the formal dedication including people from eight other Legion posts and a rear Admiral with the SOC. The post got a flag that was flown over the capital courtesy of LaHood. For mroe information on the post, call Bruner at (309) 363-3000.

This is great but it’s only a first step in honoring, a man who never forgot his Peoria roots. There is room at the Courthouse for another memorial. The county and city should do something for this man. He always made it a point to remember Peoria and we should do the same. It is not often that you can say a military legend was alive when you ere and from your home town.

Limestone – FD – epaulets guy –

Journal Star (Peoria, IL) - Friday, November 29, 1991

Limestone Scholar's Recognition Program recently honored sophomores, juniors and seniors for outstanding academic

achievements. To be recognized the students must achieve at least a cumulative 3.6 grade point average (A-) on a 4.0 scale. Those receiving medals were: Seniors _ Richard Bentley, Hanna Cadle, Andrea Crowson, Sarah Dancey, Joy Day, Amy Duncan, Leigh Fleming, Lisa Hayworth, Brian Hodge, Brian Kramer, Matthew Murphy, Mark Perschnick, Scott Russell, Andrew Small, Annette Smith, Carrie Stear, Chad Turner, Jennifer Vaughn, Paul Wilkins. Juniors _ Jeremy Anderson, Mariann Becker, Corey Bennett, Ryan Bradle, Janet Carlson, Tracey Collie, Jessica Curtis, Heather Dillashaw, Douglas Hattermann, Chadmark Heuer, Tami Hoffman, Jennifer Houlihan, Angela Inman, Thomas Johnson, Mindy Johnston, Matthew Johnston, Jennifer Koeppel, Delisa Krause, Casey Landwehr, Jill Lauterbach, Jill Martin, Robin Matthews, Peggy Meeks, Tonya Melton, Erik Parmenter, Julia Preston, Renee Sanford, Jeffrey Seyller, Jodie Short, Holly Showalter, Melissa Shryock, Sybil Smith, Amber Stear, Lisa Stranz, Jason Thomason, Allison Walker, Jennifer Wignall. Sophomores _ Bruce Adami, Erin Baier, Grant Behrens, Jamie Belcher, Kent Brubaker, Bret Crane, Scott Davis, Emily Eiff, Ralph Foreaker, Karyn Henderson, Gerald Hoak, Dale Howard, Nathaniel Hurn , Angela Hutton, Andrew Kirk, Corey Knauer, Kevin Kramer, Andrew Ledeboer, Angela Montrella, Diana Mooney, Michelle Ochs, Lisa Richardson, Jinnifer Roberts, Roni Schwindenhammer, Joshua Smith, Kimberly Smith, Christopher Thomas, Amanca VonBehren, Alexis Wellmaker and Robert Wittmer.

Peoria Journal Star, The (IL) - Sunday, January 15, 2006

Hurn, Emmerson Nicole, daughter, Dec. 18, 2005, to Nathaniel Hurn and Marsha Horton of Bartonville. Grandparents are Sue and Denny Brinker of Bartonville and Jayne Horton of Princeton.

Bernard Schoenburg: Laborers' group backs Coffey for mayor

Addison Press (IL) - Saturday, January 22, 2011

Author: THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

STEVE DUTTON, 29, is the new Washington, D.C.-based communications director for U.S. Rep. AARON SCHOCK , R-Peoria.

Schock , a second-term House member who is on the Ways and Means Committee, is likely to remain in the spotlight, so Dutton should have plenty to do. Schock - also 29 - remains the youngest member of Congress.

Dutton, a native of Argyle, Texas,

earlier was communications director and leadership aide to

U.S. Rep. KAY GRANGER, R-Texas, and before that

scheduler for retired U.S. Rep. HENRY BONILLA, also a Texas Republican.

Dutton began his career in Washington as a legislative assistant in the public affairs office of UPS.

He said Schock knows both his former bosses, adding that he was lucky to get the new post. He's being paid $75,000 annually, and replaces the very able

DAVE NATONSKI, who has joined the staff of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.


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Iconic: Bob had auditioned for the role of lead guitarist of KISS in 1972 but ultimately lost out to Ace Frehley, as he is seen performing with Gene Simmons in October 2012

Paying homage: The official KISS account retweeted Bruce's original post with the statement: 'We are heartbroken. Our deepest condolences to the Kulick family in this difficult time'

Bob had auditioned for the role of lead guitarist of KISS in 1972 but ultimately lost out to Ace Frehley.

However, his younger brother Bruce ended up occupying the same slot Bob auditioned for from 1984 to 1996. Bruce is currently in KISS coverband Kuarantine with AEW pro-wrestler and lead singer Chris Jericho.

Bob did spend time with the band and even contributed to in-studio guitar work on four KISS albums but was uncredited.

'The winner takes all': He also composed, produced, performed, and co-wrote SpongeBob SquarePants song Sweet Victory which appeared on 2001 episode Band Geeks which became one of the most iconic anthems for fans of the highly-popular show

He also worked on lead singer Paul Stanley's 1978 solo album and even joined him on tour throughout the 1980s.

The official KISS account retweeted Bruce's original post with the statement: 'We are heartbroken. Our deepest condolences to the Kulick family in this difficult time.'

More recently, Kulick composed, produced, performed, and co-wrote SpongeBob SquarePants song Sweet Victory which appeared on 2001 episode Band Geeks which became one of the most iconic anthems for fans of the highly-popular show.

Trailblazer: He (seen in Las Vegas back in August 2013) had a long career performing with some of the biggest acts in music as one of his earliest jobs was playing in studio for 1976 Lou Reed hit Coney Island Baby

Icon: Lou Reed seen performing in Paris back in 1996

Kulick also appeared on Meat Loaf's 1984 album Bad Attitude and toured with the Dallas, Texas native for years.

He also produced Motorhead's 2004 version of Metallica's Whiplash which earned them a Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance.

Kulick also did session work for Diana Ross, Michael Bolton, and W.A.S.P.

Shining star: He also produced Motorhead's 2004 version of Metallica's Whiplash which earned them a Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance, as he is seen performing in LA back in October 2012

'Sorry to hear': AEW pro-wrestler and lead singer for KISS cover band Kuarantine paid tribute to Kulick

The tributes rolled in for the musician including one from the aforementioned former WWE Undisputed Champion Jericho who wrote: 'Sorry to hear about the passing of the legendary @bobkulickmusic.

'I’ve known #BobKulick for 15 years and had the pleasure of working with him three times on a few of his famous “All Star Tribute” albums. Bob was a KILLER guitar player and brought a lot of people together & gave them a lot of joy with his music. I will spend the rest of the day listening to his work! @paulstanleylive @kissonline #Meatloaf @officialmotorhead @dianaross @michaelboltonpics @loureedofficial'

Rock radio and television personality Eddie Trunk wrote: 'RIP Bob Kulick. Condolences to @brucekulick and their entire family. Bob played an important part in the history of @kiss and many others. Sad news. @BobKulickMusic.'

'Sad news': Rock radio and television personality Eddie Trunk also paid tribute


HEB in early works to build Nacogdoches location

Posted about seven years ago

It looks like the Texas-based grocer HEB will be coming to Nacogdoches in about four years.

City leaders say negotiations are ongoing to build a 60,000-square foot store at the intersection of University Drive and Northeast Stallings Drive, and open by the end of 2018.

City Manger Jim Jeffers says it will take 18 months to do the wetlands mitigation, along with other pre-construction processes. Jeffers says it will be a $15 million investment which will include some retail space.

He added the city will do what it can to encourage HEB to expedite the construction process.

The HEB will provide more than 100 jobs and deliver $3.6 million in benefits to Nacogdoches County entities.


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December 26, 2020

Do You? - Marnie Pohlmann

I rose from beside the fire, turning away from its warmth and light to adjust my eyes to the night.

“Father,” I heard the whisper of my son.

His call did not sound tired, as though he were eager to give the over-watch of our sheep to me so he could sleep beside the warmth in our camp for a few hours. Yet there was an urgency to his utterance. Not exactly fear, or even excitement, but… something different caused me to move quickly toward his voice. As I approached him, I looked about at our sheep. Each one was on its feet, looking in one direction. I reached Daveed’s side and saw he was not watching my approach but was also staring into the sky.

“Do you see what I see?” my son asked, reaching to touch my arm. I placed my hand on his shoulder, assuring him I had arrived by his side. I could not move my eyes to look at him. I, too, was mesmerized by the star.

Out of the star’s center something seemed to be moving quickly toward us and soon took on the shape of a man. I drew my son closer to my side and behind while feeling for the sling tucked into my sash. I sensed the restlessness of the sheep and knew they were gathering, huddling together, and trusting I would protect them.

“Do not be afraid.” I heard a crackling in the air and was astonished to understand the words the sound formed. The crackle continued. “I bring good news. The Messiah has come. He was born to a virgin girl, just a little way from here. If you seek him, you will find him wrapped in a simple blanket and sleeping in the hay of a manger.”

The music and dancing lights gently faded as morning’s soft light began to dawn along the distant horizon. Still, we stood looking into the sky.

“Father, did you hear what I heard?” my son still whispered but my attention was finally able to move to him.

“Yes. Yes, I did. Our Saviour is born!”

Daveed’s eyes were twinkling like the stars we had seen dance through the sky. “Can we go see him?”

“Yes. Yes, of course we must! Why else would the angel have told us?”

We left the sheep, who had calmed and were laying in the field at peace. We ran to our camp.

“Grandfather,” Daveed called. “Grandfather wake up! We are going into Bethlehem.”

My father groaned from stiff muscles as he rolled over to look at us with bleary eyes.

“Will you come with us, Grandfather? You won’t believe what we are going to see!”

“Humph. Crowded streets, Romans counting us to know our people’s strength, and probably to steal our sheep for taxes. Tomorrow is soon enough for me. But you go ahead. I’m staying right here.”

Daveed was about to protest, but my look told him to respect his grandfather’s wishes. Obviously, he had slept through the whole amazing announcement, and besides, someone should stay with the flock.

“May I choose a lamb to offer to the King?” Daveed suggested.

“Yes. Yes, a good idea. Hurry, though.”

With the unblemished lamb across his shoulders, Daveed skipped to keep up with my quick walk, but I did not wish to slow down. Soon we saw other shepherds moving toward the town. The boys, cousins from the same family line as us, of Jesse and David’s heritage, ran to one another.

“Did you see what we saw?” “Did you hear what we heard?” The excitement of the youth bubbled about.

I joined the other men for the walk into Bethlehem. We tried to contain our exuberance, choosing instead to speak of the Scriptures we had been made to learn before being allowed into the field to join the family business.

“Didn’t Isaiah say the Messiah would be born of a virgin?”
“Immanuel, God with us.”
“Micah said our King would come from Bethlehem. Imagine, our little town of Bethlehem!”
“The coming of the Messiah will change the world.”
“Hallelujah!”

The popular Christmas song, “Do You Hear What I Hear” was written by Gloria Shayne Baker and her husband, Noel Regney, in 1962. Bing Crosby sang the song the next year, and many artists since, including Whitney Houston and Carrie Underwood, have performed this favourite since then. My favourite version is done by the accapella group, Home Free, recorded in 2014.

This song reminds me that my Saviour is coming so I need to be ready for his appearance, however that will look. I believe Scripture prophesies Jesus’ return as accurately as his birth. We need to learn the prophesies and watch for the signs, even though I am sure we will still be as surprised as the shepherds when He does come. Will you join me in the waiting and watching?

Do you see what I see?
Do you hear what I hear?

photos courtesy of CCO license, Pixabay.com


Contains photographs of the kublick Railroad station - History

Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 12:43

Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 15:47

Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 15:47

Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 15:47

paw/memorials/memdisplay.php?id=7582">died last March</a> at age 80. . Mellody Hobson ’91, president of Ariel Capital Management, is one of 65 "achievers under 40" named to <em>Black Enterprise</em> magazine's <a href="http://www.blackenterprise.com/hotlist/list.asp">2007 Hot List</a> Nov. 26. In addition to young standouts in business and medicine, the list includes entertainers and pro sports stars such as Jay-Z, Alicia Keys, Will Smith, and Tiger Woods. . Marketplace, the business radio program from American Public Media, <a href="http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2007/11/29/corner_office_whitman_transcript/">interviewed</a> eBay CEO Meg Whitman ’77 about the Web site's future and its role in holiday shopping as part of the "Conversations from the Corner Office" series Nov. 29. . Cornel West *80 joined Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama on stage at a Nov. 29 fundraiser at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. The <a href="http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hisMZbuLOVNUCONuh2Z709Lo2IkAD8T7P6CG0">Associated Press reported</a> that West defended Obama's civil rights credentials, saying that the Senator's candidacy "comes at an incredibly powerful moment in the year 2007, and we don't expect him to be Marcus Garvey . or Martin Luther King."<br> </h5> <h3><strong>Carols for a cause</strong></h3> <h5> <p>[node:field-image-collection:0:render]</p>The Princeton University Chapel Choir has joined seven other local singing ensembles to create a new CD, "A Princeton Christmas: For the Children of Africa." The project aims to raise funds for the school feeding campaign of the United Nations World Food Program in Africa. The Chapel Choir contributed six tracks to the album, ranging from the classic "The First Noel" to the lesser-known "Mariabaen," a traditional carol from Iceland. Additional information is available at the Princeton Christmas <a href="http://www.princetonchristmas.org/">Web site</a>.<br> </h5> <h3><strong>Tigers on the McCarter stage</strong></h3> <h5>Two alumni actors are performing in McCarter Theatre's annual production of the Charles Dickens classic <em>A Christmas Carol</em>, which opened Dec. 2 and runs through Dec. 23. Karron Graves ’99 plays Scrooge's sister Fan, and Jed Peterson ’06 is a member of the ensemble. Graves performed in <em>Coram Boy</em> on Broadway and has appeared in several off-Broadway productions and television shows. Peterson started his stage career as a young dancer in the New York City Ballet production of <em>The Nutcracker</em> and served as the artistic director of Princeton Summer Theater as an undergraduate.<br> </h5>

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paw/web_exclusives/alumni_spotlight/as121405_devaron.html">Tina deVaron ྊ</a> will share her mix of jazz, blues, and pop tunes in a show called "Moms and Dads Night Out," Oct. 6 at 8 p.m. at the Yardley Community Center in Yardley, Pa. The show will include selections from deVaron's upcoming musical, <em>Mom is Not My Real Name</em>. . Los Angeles-based poet and actor <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/web_exclusives/alumni_spotlight/as_032107hkolski.html">Joe Hernandez-Kolski ྜ</a> will perform his show, "Refried Latino Pride," at William Paterson University in Wayne, N.J., Oct. 11 at 12:30 p.m. In the production, Hernandez-Kolski combines comedy, spoken-word poetry, and dance to explore his mixed Polish and Mexican heritage. . <em>The Rockae</em>, a new musical from <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/12-0406/notebook.html#Notebook6">composer and lyricist Peter Mills ྛ and director Cara Reichel ྜ</a> based on Euripides' <em>The Bacchae</em>, will run through Oct. 14 at the Hudson Guild Theatre in New York.</p> <h3><strong>Cutting the ribbon</strong></h3> <p><img alt="i-aa3d2bf9b6498678bf9c0de93b318ed5-Web_10-03-07.jpg" src="http://blogs.princeton.edu/paw/files/import/i-aa3d2bf9b6498678bf9c0de93b318ed5-Web_10-03-07.jpg" /> Meg Whitman ྉ, CEO of eBay, was on hand Sept. 27 when the University dedicated Whitman College, Princeton's newest residential college. Whitman was the lead donor for the Demetri Porphyrios *80-designed dormitory complex, which President Tilghman called a "seamless integration of residential, academic, and social life." Whitman and college master Harvey Rosen cut an orange ribbon at the ceremony, but the college actually opened its doors to students in early September.<br /> <em>Photo by Frank Wojciechowski</em></p> <h3><strong>History in the making</strong></h3> <p>In its 138 seasons, the Princeton football team has done just about everything, winning national championships, completing undefeated seasons, and facing off against more than 70 different opponents. But the Tigers' Oct. 6 game against Hampton Oct. 6 will be something new: the first time that Princeton will play against a historically black college. The University is marking the occasion with several alumni events, including a lecture by English and African American studies professor Daphne Brooks at 11 a.m. in McCormick Hall, an open house at the Center for African American Studies, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and the annual Association of Black Princeton Alumni tailgate, near the observatory, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. The game, which starts at 3:30 p.m., has attracted local interest as well. Trenton Mayor Doug Palmer, a 1973 Hampton alumnus, taped an advertisement for the Princeton athletics Web site, promising a "battle of the titans" between the Pirates, last year's Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference champions, and the Tigers, 2006 Ivy League co-champions. Hampton (3-1) suffered its first loss, to Delaware State, last week, while Princeton (2-1) is coming off a 42-32 win over Columbia.</p>

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paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/07-1218/moment.html">2002 interview</a>, a <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/07-0128/features2.html">2004 feature story</a>, and most recently, in an <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/01-0926/onthecampus.html">On the Campus column</a> about student reporter Wesley Morgan ’10, who was embedded with Petraeus and others in Iraq last summer. <br><br><strong>February</strong> <br> In women's squash, undefeated Princeton competes at the Howe Cup, the sport's national championship, and tops Brown, Yale, and Harvard en route to a perfect season and its <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/10-0321/sports.html#Sports1">first national title since 1999</a>. "It's quite an honor to be able to put together a group of women to win the national title," coach Gail Ramsay tells PAW. "[Squash] is very competitive. Small, but very competitive." <br><br><strong>March</strong><br> Princeton chemistry professor David MacMillan and his colleagues <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/12-0411/notebook.html#Notebook1">publish a paper</a> in <em>Science</em> March 29 outlining a new way assemble organic molecules without using toxic catalysts. The approach, which could speed the development of new drugs, is a "creative breakthrough," according to John Schwab, a program director at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, which helped fund the research. <br><br><strong>April</strong><p>[node:field-image-collection:0:render]</p> <br> Moshin Hamid ’93 releases his novel, <em>The Reluctant Fundamentalist</em>, drawing favorable reviews in the United States and abroad (<em>The New York Times</em> and Amazon.com both selected it as one of the year's 100 best books). PAW <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/12-0411/features_coverstory.html">profiled the author</a> and published an excerpt of the book, which features the protagonist Changez, a native of Pakistan who attends Princeton, works in Manhattan, and develops a complicated view of the United States after Sept. 11. "Changez is not meant to be me," Hamid tells PAW, "but I could imagine being him." <br><br><strong>May</strong> <br><a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/15-0718/features_reunions.html">Reunions 2007</a> draws about 20,000 alumni, family members, and friends to campus, starting on May 31, for receptions, family events, educational programs, and the annual P-rade. On June 5, 1,127 undergraduates and 716 graduate students <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/15-0718/features_commencement.html">receive their degrees</a> and join the alumni community. <br><br><strong>June</strong><img src="http://blogs.princeton.edu/paw/files/import/i-7e151efb5b257b8baa10c5780065faee-december.jpg" alt="i-7e151efb5b257b8baa10c5780065faee-december.jpg"><br> The University announces that Bill Frist ’74, the former Senate majority leader, will join the Woodrow Wilson School faculty in 2007-08 as the Frederick H. Schultz Class of 1951 Visiting Professor of International Economic Policy. A December <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/06-1212/features_frist.html">PAW feature</a> followed Frist and Professor Uwe Reinhardt into the classroom for their course, "The Political Economy of Health Systems."<br><br><strong>July</strong> <br> San Diego Padres right-hander Chris Young ’02 pitches in Major League Baseball's All-Star game July 10, retiring one batter in the top of the fifth inning before giving up a two-run in-the-park home run to Ichiro Suzuki. Young is one of <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/15-0718/sports.html#Sports1">nearly a dozen alumni in professional baseball</a>, including fellow pitcher Ross Ohlendorf ’05, who made his major-league debut in September with the New York Yankees.<br><br><strong>August</strong> <br> On Aug. 2, Middle East studies scholar <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/15-0718/notebook.html#Notebook2">Haleh Esfandiari</a>, who taught Persian language and literature at Princeton from 1980 to 1994, is <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/01-0926/notebook.html#Notebook5">released from a prison</a> in Iran where she had been held on charges of espionage and endangering Iran's national security. Esfandiari strongly denied the charges. She returned to work as director of the Middle East program for the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington Sept. 10. <br><br><strong>September<p>[node:field-image-collection:1:render]</p></strong> <br> Whitman College, the University's newest residential college, <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/05-1121/features_whitman.html">opens its doors</a> to students. The complex, named for lead donor and eBay CEO <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/02-1010/notebook.html#Notebook3">Meg Whitman ’77</a>, was built at a cost of $136 million and houses about 500 students. Architect <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/03-1024/moment.html">Demetri Porphyrios *80</a> aimed for a fresh take on collegiate gothic architecture. "The current architectural taste is neo-modern, deconstructive," he tells PAW. "It's centered on aggression, where these buildings are centered on beauty." <br><br><strong>October</strong> <br> The University Art Museum and the Italian government <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/05-1121/notebook.html#Notebook1">resolve ownership of 15 works of art </a>from the museum's collection at a meeting in Rome Oct. 30, ending nearly three years of inquiries and negotiations. The Italian culture ministry suspected that some of the museum's artifacts had been acquired illegally. The University returned four works, transferred ownership on four others (but kept them on temporary loan), and secured permanent title to the seven remaining works under review. Museum director Susan Taylor maintained that all of the objects were obtained in good faith. <br><br><strong>November</strong> <br> The University formally launches <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/06-1212/notebook.html#Notebook1">the largest fundraising campaign in its history</a> -- $1.75 billion over the next five years -- with three days of events for alumni leaders, volunteers, and donors. Priorities in the campaign include Annual Giving engineering, energy, and the environment exploration in the arts neuroscience, genomics, and theoretical physics national and global citizenship and the "Princeton experience." Campaign co-chairman <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/04-1107/moment.html">Robert Murley ’72</a> tells PAW that while Princeton's goal may not be as lofty as the multi-billion-dollar campaigns at Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania, "on a per-capita or per-student basis it is a very large campaign. It certainly is large and important for Princeton."<br><br><strong>December</strong> <br> The Dec. 13 announcement of Sachs Scholar Pauline Yeung ’08 concludes a remarkable season of awards for Princeton seniors. Three members of the Class of 2008 were named Rhodes Scholars in late November - Sherif Girgis, Brett Masters, and Landis Stankievech - marking the first time since 1995 that three Princeton undergraduates were selected. Sarah Vander Ploeg ’08 was chosen to be a Marshall Scholar, while Yeung was selected for the Sachs Scholarship, a Princeton honor named for Daniel Sachs ’60. All five students will pursue graduate studies in Great Britain next fall. <br><br><strong>A note to our readers</strong> <br> The Weekly Blog will not post on Dec. 26 but will return in the new year with more news and notes.<br> </h5>

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paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/16-0605/sports.html">Mark Shapiro ’89</a> and Boston Red Sox president <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/12-0407/features2.html">Larry Lucchino ’67</a>. Their teams will face off in the American League Championship Series, starting Oct. 12.<br> In 2004, Lucchino helped the Red Sox win their first World Series in 86 years, and Shapiro is hoping to end another long streak of futility. Cleveland has not won baseball's top prize since 1948 and likely will be the underdog against Boston, but Shapiro has confidence in his young team. "We're going to put up a fight," he told MLB.com. "You can bet on that."</h5> <br> <h3><strong>Sheinkman ’85's latest, in New York</strong></h3> <img src="http://blogs.princeton.edu/paw/files/import/i-a300fc5407facdc8e54003373f56fc41-sheinkman.jpg" alt="i-a300fc5407facdc8e54003373f56fc41-sheinkman.jpg"> <h5>"Concourse" (96 by 175 inches oil, alkyd, and graphite on linen), pictured above, is one of several new works that artist Mark Sheinkman ’85 will be exhibiting at the Von Lintel Gallery in New York (555 West 25th St.) from Oct. 11 through Nov. 24. Earlier this year, when the <em>Philadelphia Inquirer</em> reviewed a previous show, critic Edith Newhall wrote that the smoke-like lines in Sheinkman's recent pieces have "an appealingly mysterious character." The new exhibition is Sheinkman's 10th solo show in New York. <br><em>Photo courtesy of Chris Burke.</em> </h5> <br> <h3><strong>More at <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw">PAW Online</a></strong></h3> <h5> <strong>Rally ’Round the Cannon</strong> - In his Princeton history column, Gregg Lange ’70 tells how University visitors can journey back into China's past.<br><br><strong>On the Campus</strong> - For some grad students, a home in the residential colleges for others a "boot camp" in math.</h5> <br>

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paw/web_exclusives/alumni_spotlight/as060705wythe.html">Jennifer Wythes Vettel ’86</a>, a former teacher who earned her master's degree with Eastside principal and founder Chris Bishchof, led the fundraising campaign for Princeton House, and last spring, President Tilghman spoke at the dormitory's dedication. Tilghman is pictured at right with, from left, Wythes Vettel, Paul Wythes ’55, Bishchof, Linda Knoll, and Marcia Wythes. <br><em>Photo courtesy of Liz Gaither.</em> </h5> <h3><strong>Bhangra boogie</strong></h3> <h5> <p>[node:field-image-collection:3:render]</p>Students from the Princeton Bhangra dance troupe perform at the Mela festival outside Robertson Hall Oct. 13. The festival, sponsored by the South Asian Students Association, celebrated South Asian culture and cuisine with live music, dance performances, henna artists, and a fashion show.<br><em>Photo by Frank Wojciechowski.</em><br> </h5>

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triangle" target="_blank">Web site</a> . <em>Photo by Frank Wojciechowski</em> <h3><strong>Fresh starts for men's, women's basketball</strong></h3> At Princeton basketball's media day Nov. 6, new men's head coach Sydney Johnson ’97 was tight-lipped about his team's starting lineup, focusing instead on his goal of continuous improvement. "If we're better today than we were yesterday, you're talking to a happy coach," Johnson said. So is he happy now? "I'm fairly happy," he said. "I do think I'd be worried if I felt like this is our best basketball right now." Three starters -- Kyle Koncz ’08, Marcus Schroeder ’10, and Lincoln Gunn ’10 -- return for the Tigers, along with key reserves Noah Savage ’08, Zach Finley ’10, and Mike Strittmatter ’09. Penn, the defending Ivy champion, lost three starters to graduation, including All-Ivy players Ibby Jaaber and Mark Zoller, and Cornell, Yale, and Columbia are positioned to be strong challengers this year. Princeton, which was 2-12 in the league last season, aims to join that group. The men play two home games (Nov. 11 vs. Central Connecticut and Nov. 14 vs. Iona) before facing Duke at the EA Sports Maui Invitational Nov. 19. On the women's side, new coach Courtney Banghart named her starters for Princeton's opening game at Maryland Nov. 9: Meg Cowher ’08, Whitney Downs ’09, Caitlin O'Neill ’09, Ali Prichard ’08, and Tani Brown ’10. Of the five, Brown has the least experience, appearing in just 11 games as a freshman, but Banghart hopes that her strong front line can carry the team in its early games. Cowher had a record-setting season in 2006-07, scoring 496 points (17.7 per game) to break the Tigers' single-season high, set by Sandi Bittler ’90 in 1989. Banghart thinks that her star forward's best is yet to come, thanks to her improvement on left-handed post moves. "She has a much more diverse arsenal now," Banghart said. "When someone who is your star also is one of your best workers and is very coachable, that's a deadly combination. She is both of those things." This season, the Tigers will face a challenging non-league schedule as they prepare for Ivy play, with home games against California (Dec. 8), Rutgers (Dec. 12), Syracuse (Dec. 16), and Vanderbilt (Jan. 5). <h3><strong>Jadwin's wild side</strong></h3> With the exception of the players themselves, few students are more excited about the start of basketball season than Jamie Blackburn ’08, Jakob Deitch ’08, and Dave Valentine ’08, leaders of the Jadwin Jungle student cheering section. In October and November, the three seniors canvassed the eating clubs and residential colleges to recruit this year's crop of rowdy Princeton rooters. Getting students to sign up is not too difficult (Jungle members get a free T-shirt -- orange and white tie-dye this year), and getting them to show up for a few games is no problem (free pizza is served before tip-off). But to build a consistently strong cheering section, you need a strong core of fans who feel invested in the team, Blackburn said, and "winning helps." Last year, the men's team's 2-12 record in Ivy games took its toll on turnout in the Jungle. A new season and a new coach have restored some of the excitement, and even if championship play does not return to the court, the three stalwart cheerleaders have learned to devote their energy to more creativity in the bleachers. They've helped to develop a few lasting gimmicks -- yelling "off the hook" when a Tiger sinks a hook shot, falling backward when a Princeton defender draws a charge, and waving cafeteria trays for 3-pointers (or "treys") <strong>—</strong> but Valentine's favorite idea has remained elusive. "We'd like to get a door so we can hold it up for backdoor [lay-ups]," he explained, "but we haven't figured that one out yet." <h3><strong>Early 'Winter'</strong></h3> <h5><img src="http://blogs.princeton.edu/paw/files/import/i-2ca6a99e1145903000de30da93eed0ef-WEB1107.jpg" alt="i-2ca6a99e1145903000de30da93eed0ef-WEB1107.jpg"></h5> Kut Akdogan ’10, left, and Sara-Ashley Bischoff ’09, rehearse a scene from Shakespeare's <em>The Winter's Tale</em> , the fall show of Princeton University's Program in Theater and Dance, which debuts at the Berlind Theatre Nov. 9. New York-based director and choreographer Tracy Bersley, a lecturer in the theater and dance program, will direct the production's five performances, Nov. 9, 10, 15, 16, and 17, at 8 p.m. <em>Photo by Frank Wojciechowski</em> <h3><strong>More at <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw">PAW Online</a></strong></h3> <strong>Math lessons</strong> - What Carl L. Heimowitz ’64 remembers about his days in the math department are the people - "alternately crazy and great" - doing work that changed the world. <strong>War stories</strong> - E.B. Boyd ’89 profiles five young alumni who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. <strong>Rally ’Round the Cannon</strong> - Gregg Lange ’70 describes how, in the days before the <em>Nassau Herald</em> or the <em>Bric-a-Brac</em> , the Senior Autograph Book spoke volumes.

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paw/archive_new/PAW07-08/05-1121/features_captain.html">profiled in the Nov. 21 issue of PAW</a>) before falling to Duke 83-61 in the first round of the EA Sports Maui Invitational Nov. 19. Through the first three games, Finley led Princeton in scoring (14.7 points per game) and was tied for first in rebounding (5.3 rebounds per game).<br /> <em>Photo by Frank Wojciechowski</em></p> <p><strong>New book: Persuasion as art</strong></p> <p>Do you woo? You should, if you hope to succeed in business, according to Wharton professor G. Richard Shell ’71 and colleague Mario Moussa, the authors of <em>The Art of Woo: Using Strategic Persuasion to Sell Your Ideas</em> (Portfolio). "Woo-ing," in this case, refers to "winning others over," a concept coined by Marcus Buckingham and Donald Clifton in their bestseller, <em>Now, Discover Your Strengths</em>. Shell and Moussa dissect the important steps of wooing, from getting people's attention to closing a deal, using anecdotes about some of history's "greatest persuaders" and lists of things to keep in mind, including "10 questions for would-be wooers."<br /> For information about other books by alumni and faculty, visit <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/web_exclusives/books/books0607.html">New Books</a> at PAW online.</p> <p><strong>More at PAW Online</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/web_exclusives/plus/plus_112107goathead.html">Roman ambassador</a> -- In the wake of the Art Museum's recent return of Italian artifacts, PAW revisits the post-World War II story of a well-traveled ancient goat head.<br /> <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/columns/on_the_campus/on_the_campus_112107.html">On the Campus</a> -- On the Street, the mood has swung from carefree to careful the Office of Religious Life moves to "humanize" the Chapel.<br /> <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/paw/columns/rally_round/rrc112107.html">Rally ’Round the Cannon</a> -- Gregg Lange ’70 probes the mystery of why the Cannon on the Green is slowly sinking.</p>

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paw.</p> <p><strong>Volume 107 (2006-07)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/01-0927/table_of_contents.html">September 27, 2006</a>&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp</p> <p>Number 2 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/02-1011/table_of_contents.html">October 11, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 3 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/03-1025/table_of_contents.html">October 25, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 4 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/04-1108/table_of_contents.html">November 8, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 5 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/05-1122/table_of_contents.html">November 22, 2006</a>&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp</p> <p>Number 6 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/06-1213/table_of_contents.html">December 13, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 7 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/07-0124/table_of_contents.html">January 24, 2007 </a></p> <p>Number 8 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/08-0214/table_of_contents.html">February 14, 2007</a></p> <p>Number 9 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/09-0307/table_of_contents.html">March 7, 2007</a>&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp</p> <p>Number 10 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/10-0321/table_of_contents.html">March 21, 2007</a></p> <p>Number 11 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/11-0404/table_of_contents.html">April 4, 2007</a>&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp</p> <p>Number 12 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/12-0411/table_of_contents.html">April 18, 2007</a></p> <p>Number 13 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/13-0509/table_of_contents.html">May 9, 2007</a>&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp</p> <p>Number 14 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/14-0606/table_of_contents.html">June 6, 2007</a></p> <p>Number 15 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW06-07/15-0718/table_of_contents.html">July 18, 2007</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 106 (2005-06)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 - <a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/01-0914/table_of_contents.html">September 14, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/02-1005/table_of_contents.html">October 5, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/03-1019/table_of_contents.html">October 19, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/04-1102/table_of_contents.html">November 2, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/05-1116/table_of_contents.html">November 16, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/06-1214/table_of_contents.html">December 14, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/07-0125/table_of_contents.html">January 25, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/08-0215/table_of_contents.html">February 15, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/09-0308/table_of_contents.html">March 8, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/10-0322/table_of_contents.html">March 22, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 11 -<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/11-0405/table_of_contents.html">&nbspApril 5, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/12-0419/table_of_contents.html">April 19, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/13-0510/table_of_contents.html">May 10, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/14-0607/table_of_contents.html">June 7, 2006</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW05-06/15-0719/table_of_contents.html">July 19, 2006</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 105 (2004-05)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/01-0915/table_of_contents.html">September 15, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/02-1006/table_of_contents.html">October 6, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/03-1020/table_of_contents.html">October 20, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/04-1103/table_of_contents.html">November 3, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/05-1117/table_of_contents.html">November 17, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/06-1208/table_of_contents.html">December 8, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/07-0126/table_of_contents.html">January 26, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/08-0209/table_of_contents.html">February 9, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 9 -<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/09-0223/table_of_contents.html">&nbspFebruary 23, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/10-0309/table_of_contents.html">March 9, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/11-0323/table_of_contents.html">March 23, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/12-0406/table_of_contents.html">April 6, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/13-0420/table_of_contents.html">April 20, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/14-0511/table_of_contents.html">May 11, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/15-0608/table_of_contents.html">June 8, 2005</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW04-05/16-0706/table_of_contents.html">July 6, 2005</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 104 (2003-04)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/01-0910/table_of_contents.html">September 10, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/02-1008/table_of_contents.html">October 8, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/03-1022/table_of_contents.html">October 22, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/04-1105/table_of_contents.html">November 5, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/05-1119/table_of_contents.html">November 19, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/06-1217/table_of_contents.html">December 17, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/07-0128/table_of_contents.html">January 28, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/08-0211/table_of_contents.html">February 11, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/09-0225/table_of_contents.html">February 25, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/10-0310/table_of_contents.html">March 10, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/11-0324/table_of_contents.html">March 24, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/12-0407/table_of_contents.html">April 7, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/13-0421/table_of_contents.html">April 21, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/14-0512/table_of_contents.html">May 12, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/15-0609/table_of_contents.html">June 9, 2004</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW03-04/16-0707/table_of_contents.html">July 7, 2004</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 103&nbsp(2002-03)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/01-0912/table_of_contents.html">September 11, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/02-1009/table_of_contents.html">October 9, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/03-1023/table_of_contents.html">October 23, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/04-1106/table_of_contents.html">November 6, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/05-1120/table_of_contents.html">November 20, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/06-1204/table_of_contents.html">December 4. 2002</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/07-1218/table_of_contents.html">December 18, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/08-0129/table_of_contents.html">January 29, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/09-0212/table_of_contents.html">February 12, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/10-0226/table_of_contents.html">February 26, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/11-0312/table_of_contents.html">March 12, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/12-0326/table_of_contents.html">March 26, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/13-0409/table_of_contents.html">April 9, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/14-0423/table_of_contents.html">April 23, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/15-0514/table_of_contents.html">May 14, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/16-0604/table_of_contents.html">June 4, 2003</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW02-03/17-0702/table_of_contents.html">July 2, 2003</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 102&nbsp(2001-02)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/01-0912/table_of_contents.html">September 12, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/02-0929/table_of_contents.html">October 10, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/03-1024/table_of_contents.html">October 24, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/04-1107/table_of_contents.html">November 7, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/05-1121/table_of_contents.html">November 21, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/06-1205/table_of_contents.html">December 5, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/07-1219/table_of_contents.html">December 19, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/08-0130/table_of_contents.html">January 30, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/09-0213/table_of_contents.html">February 13, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/10-0227/table_of_contents.html">February 27, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/11-0313/table_of_contents.html">March 13, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/12-0327/table_of_contents.html">March 27, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/13-0410/table_of_contents.html">April 10, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/14-0424/table_of_contents.html">April 24, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/15-0515/table_of_contents.html">May 15, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/16-0605/table_of_contents.html">June 5, 2002</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW01-02/17-0703/table_of_contents.html">July 3, 2002</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 101 (2000-01)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/01-0913/table_of_contents.html">September 13, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/02-1011/table_of_contents.html">October 11, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/03-1025/table_of_contents.html">October 25, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/04-1108/table_of_contents.html">November 8, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/05-1122/table_of_contents.html">Novermber 22, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/06-1206/table_of_contents.html">December 6, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/07-1220/table_of_contents.html">December 20, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/08-0124/table_of_contents.html">January 24, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/09-0207/table_of_contents.html">February 7, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/10-0221/table_of_contents.html">February 21, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/11-0307/table_of_contents.html">March 7, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/12-0321/table_of_contents.html">March 21, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/13-0404/table_of_contents.html">April 4, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/14-0418/table_of_contents.html">April 18, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/15-0516/table_of_contents.html">May 16, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/16-0606/table_of_contents.html">June 6, 2001</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_new/PAW00-01/17-0704/table_of_contents.html">July 4, 2001</a></p> <p><strong>Volume 100&nbsp(1999-2000)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/01-0908/0908.html">September 8, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/02-1006/1006.html">October 6, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/03-1020/1020.html">October 20, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/04-1103/1103.html">November 3, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/05-1117/1117.html">November 17, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/06-1201/1201.html">December 1,1999</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/07-1215/1215.html">December 15, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/08-0126/0126.html">January 26, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/09-0209/0209.html">February 9, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/10-0223/0223.html">February 23, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/11-0308/0308.html">March 8, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/12-0322/0322.html">March 22, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/13-0405/0405.html">April 5, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/14-0419/0419.html">April 19, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/15-0517/0517.html">May 17, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/16-0607/0607.html">June 7, 2000</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW99-00/17-0705/0705.html">July 5, 2000</a> &nbsp</p> <p><strong>Volume 99 (1998-99)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/01-0909/0909.html">September 9, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/02-1007/1007.html">October 7, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/03-1021/1021.html">October 21, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/04-1104/1104.html">November 4, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/05-1118/1118.html">November 18, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/06-1202/1202.html">December 2, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/07-1216/1216.html">December 16, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/08-0127/0127.html">January 27, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/09-0210/0210.html">February 10, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/10-0224/0224.html">February 24, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/11-0310/0310.html">March 10, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/12-0324/0324.html">March 24, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/13-0407/0407.html">April 7, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/14-0421/0421.html">April 21, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/15-0519/0519.html">May 19, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/16-0609/0609.html">June 9, 1999</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW98-99/17-0707/0707.html">July 7, 1999</a> &nbsp</p> <p><strong>Volume 98 (1997-98)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/01-0910/0910.html">September 10, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/02-1008/1008.html">October 8, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/03-1022/1022.html">October 22, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/04-1105/1105.html">November 5, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/05-1119/1119.html">November 19, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/06-1203/1203.html">December 3, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/07-1217/1217.html">December 17, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/08-0128/0128.html">January 28, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/09-0211/0211.html">February 11, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/10-0225/0225.html">February 25, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/11-0311/0311.html">March 11, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/12-0325/0325.html">March 25, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/13-0408/0408.html">April 8, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/14-0422/0422.html">April 22, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/15-0520/0520.html">May 20, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/16-0610/0610.html">June 10, 1998</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW97-98/17-0708/0708.html">July 8, 1998</a> &nbsp</p> <p><strong>Volume 97 (1996-97)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/01-0911/0911.html">September 11, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/02-1009/1009.html">October 9, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/03-1023/1023.html">October 23, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/04-1106/1106.html">November 6, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/05-1127/1127.html">November 27, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/06-1211/1211.html">December 11, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/07-1225/1225.html">December 25, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/08-0122/0122.html">January 22, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/09-0205/0205.html">February 5, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/10-0219/0219.html">February 19, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/11-0305/0305.html">March 5, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/12-0319/0319.html">March 19, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/13-0402/0402.html">April 2, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/14-0416/0416.html">April 16, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/15-0507/0507.html">May 7, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/16-0604/0604.html">June 4, 1997</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW96-97/17-0702/0702.html">July 2, 1997</a> &nbsp</p> <p><strong>Volume&nbsp96 (1995-96)</strong></p> <p>Number 1 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/01_9596/0913.html">September 13, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 2 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/02_9596/1011.html">October 11, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 3 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/03_9596/1025.html">October 25, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 4 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/04_9596/1108.html">November 8, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 5 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/05_9596/1122.html">November 22, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 6 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/06_9596/1206.html">December 6, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 7 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/07_9596/1220.html">December 20, 1995</a></p> <p>Number 8 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/08_9596/0124.html">January 24, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 9 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/09_9596/0207.html">February 7, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 10 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/10_9596/0221.html">February 21, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 11 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/11_9596/0306.html">March 6, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 12 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/12_9596/0320.html">March 20, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 13 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/13_9596/0403.html">April 3, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 14 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/14_9596/0417.html">April 17, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 15 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/15_9596/0508.html">May 8, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 16 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/16_9596/0605.html">June 5, 1996</a></p> <p>Number 17 -&nbsp<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/

paw/archive_old/PAW95-96/17_9596/0703.html">July 3, 1996</a></p>


Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Sixties Sex Comedies Part Three

The late Fifties saw the emergence of the sex comedy. In 1958 a cycle towards sex comedies began with three different films being released. By 1960 the Sixties sex comedy cycle was well under way. That year saw several different sex comedies released.

Among these was the film Let's Make Love, starring Marilyn Monroe and Yves Montand. The movie's plot centred around millionaire Jean-Marc Clement (Yves Montand), who visits the set of an off-Broadway revue, only to be mistaken for an actor supposed to play him. Clement plays along and takes the part so he can be close to actress Amanda Dell. As mentioned earlier, it is debatable whether The Apartment is a sex comedy or not. The Apartment centres on C. C. Baxter (Jack Lemmon), a hapless employee of a major insurance company, whose apartment is constantly taken over by his superiors at work for their extramarital affairs. This arrangement is complicated when Baxter falls in love with elevator operator Fran Kublick (Shirley MacLaine). Unfortunately, Miss Kublick had an affair with their boss, Mr. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray), who wants her back. The Battle of the Sexes, so central to the sex comedies, is nearly absent in The Apartment, existing only between Miss Kublick and Mr. Sheldrake, not between the two principal characters. And the deception that is seen in most sex comedies is absent. While it is certainly a romantic comedy, then it is doubtful The Apartment can be considered a sex comedy.

That is not to say that The Apartment would not have an influence on sex comedies. Indeed, both of its stars (Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine) would go onto star in several sex comedies. MacLaine had already appeared one sex comedy even before starring in The Apartment: Ask Any Girl in 1959. She would go onto appear in My Geisha, Irma la Douce, and What a Way to Go. Irma la Douce, released in 1963, was directed by Billy Wilder and once more teamed her with Jack Lemmon. MacLaine played the title character, a prostitute with whom ex-police officer Nestor Patou falls in love. To keep her away from men and in an effort to get her out of business, Patou pretends to be an elderly English lord, known only as Lord X. In some respects, it is debatable whether What a Way to Go is a sex comedy, as it does not really contain the Battle of the Sexes central to sex comedies. The plot centred on Louisa May Foster (Shirley MacLaine), a luckless girl whose husbands always die, often in unusual ways, trying to get rich. The Battle Between the Sexes and the deception absent from What a Way to Go, although it is still counted as a sex comedy by many.

In 1962 the cycle would continue with the release of yet more sex comedies, including Lover Come Back. Among the films released that year was Come September. Come September centred on millionaire Robert L. Talbot (Rock Hudson) who goes on vacation at his Italian villa. Unfortunately, it seems that his long term girlfriend Lisa (Gina Lollobrigida) has tired of waiting for him and is going to marry another man. Among the co-stars of Come September was Sandra Dee. Best known at the point for having played Gidget in the movie of the same name and Tammy in Tammy Tell Me True and Tammy and the Doctor, she would go onto make a few sex comedies. In fact, in 1962 she would star in If a Man Answers, playing rich socialite Chantal Stacy who is trying to train her new husband Eugene Wright (Bobby Darin) to be the perfect husband. She went onto appear in That Funny Feeling and Doctor, You've Got to be Kidding. The latter, released in 1967, was notable in that Sandra Dee actually played a woman with sexual experience. Early in the movie she finds herself pregnant with marriage proposals from three different men.

By 1962 the sex comedies had grown considerably more daring than they had in the days of Teacher's Pet. Love Come Back implied a one night stand between its two lead characters, although it was under the intoxicating effects of VIP and involved a marriage licence as well.

Nineteen sixty two saw the sex comedy cycle continue stronger than ever, with the released of A Touch of Mink and If a Man Answers. Boys' Night Out was similarly daring. The film centres on three married men and one bachelor (James Garner) who rent an apartment as a love nest for extramarital affairs. They also hire a housekeeper, a beautiful blonde named Cathy (Kim Novack). In reality, Cathy is actually a graduate student in sociology researching her thesis--the sexual fantasies of the average male. Although tame by today's standards, Boys' Night Out must have seemed risque for the era.

Boys' Night Out would be significant in introducing a new star to the sex comedies, James Garner. Best known for his role on the TV series Maverick at the time, Garner would go onto star in two more sex comedies, both important in the history of the genre. He appeared opposite Doris Day in The Thrill of It All, released in 1963. Garner played Dr. Gerald Boyer, whose Beverly (Doris Day) soon finds herself a spokesman for a major brand of soap and a television personality. He would co-star with Doris Day again in Move Over, Darling, in which Doris Day plays Ellen, a woman declared legally dead after a plane crash only to show up five years later.

From 1963 to 1965 the sex comedy cycle was at its height, with more films in the genre released than in any other three year period. Many of the films were fairly significant: Move Over, Darling, The Thrill of It All, Under the Yum Yum Tree, Send Me No Flowers, Boeing Boeing, and How to Murder Your Wife . Two films released during this two year period are notable for their place in film history or pop culture history. Both were also released during the Christmas season of 1964. With Kiss Me, Stupid director Billy Wilder once more challenged the movie industry establishment. The film was passed by the Production Code Administration (a sign of how much the Code had weakened), but would run afoul of the Legion of Decency. The Catholic organisation would give the film a "C" rating for "Condemned," the first film it so labelled since Baby Doll in 1956. For once the Legion of Decency was not alone in its condemnation of a film. The film was roundly attacked by critics, many of whom attacked its vulgarity. Kiss Me, Stupid was very loosely based on the bedroom farce L’Ora della Fantasia by Anna Bonacci. It starred Dean Martin as a crooner called Dino, who finds himself in the small Nevada town of Climax, where struggling songwriter Orville Jeremiah Spooner (Ray Walston) tries to keep his wife Zelda (Felicia Farr) away from the handsome Dino while trying to sell the singer songs. He even goes so far as to hire a prostitute, Zelda (Kim Novack) to pose as his wife. The film dealt in adultery and in sexual humour that was much more obvious than any of its contemporaries. Roundly condemned in its time, Kiss Me, Stupid would later be re-evaluated so that its reputation was somewhat redeemed.

Also released during the holidays in 1964, Sex and the Single Girl shared its title with Helen Gurley Brown's famous sex manual. Warner Brothers had purchased the film rights to Brown's book, but ultimately the movie would be based on a screenplay that had been floating around Warner Brothers for years entitled How To Make Love and Like It. In the end, the only thing the movie would take from Brown's book was its name. The film Sex and the Single Girl cast Natalie Wood as a young sexologist named Helen Gurley Brown who crosses swords with scheming scandal sheet editor Bob Weston (Tony Curtis), who plots to seduce her and reveal her as an inexperienced virgin. As in other sex comedies, Weston pretends to be someone else in order to seduce Brown.

It was in 1966 that the cycle towards sex comedies finally showed signs of slowing down. While the past three years had yielded a bumper crop of sex comedies, 1966 would only see the release of a few. Among that year's sex comedies were The Swinger, Any Wednesday, and The Glass Bottom Boat. The Glass Bottom Boat is significant as Doris Day's last successful sex comedy. Doris Day played widow Jennifer Nelson, who has just taken a job as in public relations for NASA and also works as a mermaid for her father's glass bottom boat tours. It through her job as a mermaid for her father (Arthur Godfrey) that Jennifer meets Bruce Templeton (Rod Taylor)--he accidentally catches her while fishing. As it turns out Templeton is also Jennifer's new boss. Not only was The Glass Bottom Boat a sex comedy, but it also capitalised on the spy craze of the time. It featured a large number of cameos, including Robert Vaughn as Napoleon Solo. It was the second time Doris Day and Rod Taylor had starred together, having first appeared together in 1965's Do Not Disturb.

There was perhaps no greater sign that the sex comedy cycle was coming to an end than the fact that 1966 was the last year that Doris Day would rank in the top ten of the exhibitors' polls of the top box office stars. Nineteen sixty seven would see yet fewer sex comedies released, including Doctor, You've Got to be Kidding and A Guide for the Married Man. It would be 1968 that would see the end of the cycle. That year How to Save a Marriage (And Ruin Your Life) was released, as was Doris Day's very last sex comedy, Where Were You When the Lights Went Out. Where Were You When the Lights Went Out was set in New York City during the Great Northeast Blackout of 1965. Despite this, it was actually based on the French play Monsieur Masure by Claude Magnier. In the film Dois Day played a parody of herself, an actress typecast in virginal roles. Released in July 1968, it was the first Doris Day movie in years that did extremely poorly at the box office. At any rate, it was perhaps fitting that having started the cycle towards sex comedies, Doris Day would also end it as well.

Ultimately, the Sixties sex comedies had fallen victim to the same weakening of the production code and Sexual Revolution that had allowed them to exist to begin with. In 1961 the Production Code was revised once more, this time to include "sexual perversion (by which was pretty much meant homosexuality)." The production code would only be weakened by such foreign movies as L'Avventura, Jules et Jim, Room at the Top, Never On Sunday, and La Dolce vita, which often contained material that the current Production Code forbade in American films. American movies (including American co-productions) also challenged the Production Code. In 1964The Pawnbroker had included some very brief female nudity, which resulted in the Production Code Administration denying it a seal. This decision was overturned by the Production Code Administration's own review board.

Another challenge to the code came in the form of Blowup, directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. The movie included two scenes that the Production Code Administration found objectionable--one in which the protagonist cavorted with two nude girls in which pubic hair was very briefly visible, and another scene in which the protagonist watched his neighbour make love. Rather than cut the scenes, the film's distributor, MGM (originally a strong supporter of the Production Code), simply released the film under its subsidiary Premier Productions without a seal. The film did quite well at the box office. Curiously, it would not be the full frontal nudity of Blowup that would break the Production Code, but the four letter words of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf.. The film was based on the Broadway play of the same name, which utilised exceedingly coarse language, including the word "goddamn" no less than fifteen times, as well as such words as "ass" and "son of a bitch." Before the film was even made, then the Production Code Administration advised Warner Brothers to remove every bit of profanity and coarse language. After negotiations with the Production Code Administration, in the end Warner Brothers only wound up cutting the words "screw you" and "frigging" from the film and added a special warning all advertisements for the film.

While The Pawnbroker, Blowup, and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf challenged the Production Code, other films tested the boundaries of the Production Code. Some of these movies were even sex comedies, such Some Like It Hot and Kiss Me Stupid. By 1967 the Production Code was so weak that The Graduate was able to deal with adult themes such as extramarital sex. That same year two films, the screen adaptation of Ulysses and the movie I'll Never Forget What's His Name went further than Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf had--they both included the "F" word. As much more was permissible in movies by this point, the sex comedies (in which there was no sex) probably started to seem both tame and dated by 1967. The films may have lost any audience who watched them primarily for their risque content.

Indeed, it must be pointed out that as the Sixties progressed, the sex comedies became more and more risque. Some Like It Hot included cross dressing. Boys' Night Out toyed with adultery (although it never actually occurred in the film). Doctor, You've Got to be Kidding featured a heroine who actually had a child out of wedlock. The sex comedies kept up with the changes in what was acceptable in films until, at last, they could not keep up.

Just as the Production Code was weakening in the Sixties, the Sexual Revolution began to gain steam. The birth control pill was approved by the Federal Drug Administration in 1960, removing much of the threat of pregnancy from the sex act. In many quarters of the population premarital sex became acceptable. While it may not have been acceptable by other quarters of the population, it certainly became less shocking. By the late Sixties the concept of free love, which argues that sex between consenting adults should not be regulated by law, caught among among certain parts of the American populace. These changes in society effectively removed the impetus of many of the Sixties sex comedies, in which much of the plot was propelled by the woman saying, "No," to sex unless it was within the confines of marriage. It is safe to say that such films as Pillow Talk must have seemed dated by 1967.

Even without the weakening of the Production Code and the Sexual Revolution, however, the Sixties sex comedies cycle would have probably have ended sooner or later. Most movie cycles only last a few years before they burn themselves out. And by 1966 the market was literally glutted by sex comedies. It is safe to say that at some point audiences would have tired of them, even without the changes that occurred in both the movie industry and American society.

Regardless, while the sex comedy cycle would end, the sex comedies themselves would be remembered. Among some they would even become a source of controversy. There are those who maintain that the bulk of sex comedies are both sexist and misogynistic. In my opinion, however, this thought does not bear close inspection. While many sex comedies include protagonists who make speeches against both women and marriage, in nearly every sex comedy ever made such sentiments are proven wrong by the movie's end. At the end of Pillow Talk Brad Allen ceases to be misogynistic and finally concedes to Jan Morrow in having a monogamous relationship. If the films were truly misogynistic, it would be safe to say that characters who started out as playboys would remain playboys at the movies' ends.

It must also be pointed out that for films that are supposed to "sexist," the sex comedies paint a better portrait of women than many other venues in the media. While TV shows and other movies were still portraying the average American woman as a housewife, the sex comedies featured women in their own careers. There can be no better example of this than Doris Day. She was an interior decorator in Pillow Talk, an advertising executive in Lover Come Back, and in public relations in The Glass Bottom Boat. And Doris Day was not an isolated case by any stretch of the imagination. Prior to Boys' Night Out Kim Novak had previously played only sexpots Boys' Night Out was the first time she played an educated woman with her own career. In fact, it is notable that once the sex comedy cycle ended, fewer women appeared in comedies for quite some time.

Of course, it must be pointed out that in the vast majority of the movies the women want monogamous relationships, namely marriage. In none of the sex comedies, however, is it indicated that the women were actively seeking marriage before they fell in love and in none of them is it indicated that they gave up their careers after getting married. It is then true that the sex comedies are very pro-marriage. That having been said, it seems likely that this was the consensus of most Americans in the late Fifties and even in the Sixties. Playboys such as Brad Allen in Pillow Talk and Hogan in Under the Yum Yum Tree were probably not nearly as common as men who preferred to be married at the time. In this respect, then, the sex comedies were merely reflecting the mores of their time.

Since the Sixties there have been very few movies that could be considered sex comedies. One instance was a television movie from 1976 called How to Break Up a Happy Divorce, starring Barbara Eden, in which a woman seeks to win her ex-husband back. Two other instances were feature films, both made in 2003. How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, starring Kate Hudson, utilised the Battle of the Sexes and the charade of the sex comedies, but it turned it on its head. In How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, both journalist Andie Anderson (Kate Hudson) and playboy Benjamin Barry (Matthew McConaughey) are simply playing roles in their Battle of the Sexes. Down With Love was an outright pastiche of the Sixties sex comedies, drawing upon Pillow Talk, Boeing Boeing, A New Kind of Love, Sex and the Single Girl, and practically every other sex comedy made in the Sixties. The sex comedies would also influence many latter day romantic comedies, from When Harry Met Sally to Sunny Side Up.

When I was growing up the Sixties sex comedies were often shown on television, so I had many opportunities to watch them. I must confess that I enjoyed them as a child and that I still enjoy them. The plots of the sex comedies were often wonderfully complex and fully of witty dialogue. They often had excellent production values and featured great performances (due to their very form, sex comedies succeeded or failed most often because of their casts). It is not simply that many of the sex comedies were very well made, but that, like the screwball comedies of old, they were made so that members of both sexes could enjoy them. Sadly, this is not the case with most of today's romantic comedies (I have not seen Made of Honour and I never will). If the sex comedies of old are still viewed today, perhaps it is because they are so superior to romantic comedies from other eras.


Posted about seven years ago

Posted about seven years ago

Arrest Report

11/12/14&mdash11/13/14

Shelby County:

Adam McDaniel, 37, Carthage, Panola County Warrant-Theft

Stuart Bennett, 46, Tenaha, Warrant-Possession of Preserved Species

Kathleen Edwards, 24, Dallas, Dallas County Warrant-Possession of a Controlled Substance

Quincy Demond Handy, 34, Timpson, Possession of a Controlled Substance

Cullen Kendrick, 18, Joaquin, Driving While Intoxicated

San Augustine County: No Arrest Reported

Note: All subjects are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


Variations on a Theme

If you liked Oliver Laric’s 󈦒 50‘ videos I posted some time ago, you’ll probably dig this one as well. In the installation ‘a couple thousand short films about Glenn Gould’ (2007), Cory Arcangel rescores Johann Sebastian Bach’s famous 1741 composition the ‘Goldberg Variations’, based on nearly 2000 clips of amateur musicians’ performances taken from video sharing web sites such as YouTube. Each note of the score jumps between individual clips of different musicians, with each screen carrying a separate melody line. The final effect is an almost hallucinatory montage – a flood of images which we are engulfed into. Arcangel allows anonymous guitarists, keyboard players, tuba players and other enthusiasts from around the world to unintentionally collaborate in recreating Bach’s masterpiece.

From an article in Frieze (on Paul Morley’s essay in the book ‘Cory Arcangel: a couple thousand short films about Glenn Gould‘:
“Does user-generated content make possible a new form of artistry, prefigured in both Gould’s approach to the recording studio and in Wendy Carlos’s synthesizer renditions of Bach? Or are Gould and Carlos being positioned as anticipating the dissolution of the individual artist in an anonymous digital network?

As Kirby indicates, far from leading to new forms, user-generated content has tended towards retrenchment and consolidation – for example, YouTube (for the most part) recycles old material, or else provides a space in which millions of aspirant stars ape idols whose status – established by the old systems of distribution and valuation – remains secure. Instead of being cowed by the relentless demands for viewer participation, both cultural producers and the much-derided ‘gatekeepers’ need to find new ways of asserting the primacy of production over consumption. They need to find ways of stepping outside seamless circuits in which ‘everyone’ is implicated but no-one gets what they want. In another catalogue essay for a couple thousand short films…, curator Steven Bode argues that Arcangel’s installation is ‘less an advert for networked participatory culture than an index of people’s increasing atomisation.’ If postmodern culture presents a kind of networked solipsism, perhaps what Gould can now teach us most is the value of disappearance from the screens that eagerly seek our image. Gould, who famously retired early from concert playing, showed that sometimes it is necessary to withdraw in order to find better ways to connect.”