Information

Books on the Hundred Years War

Books on the Hundred Years War


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Browse ourrecommended books

Wars
General Works
War of the Roses
Crusades
Hundred Years War
1066
Castles

Books - Middle Ages- Hundred Years War

Hundred Years War

The True Chronicles of Jean le Bel, 1290-1360, trans. Nigel Bryant.The first English translation of the True Chronicles of Jean le Bel, one of the most important primary sources for the reign of Edward III and the early part of the Hundred Years War, written at the time by someone who actually participated in Edward’s early campaigns in Scotland, and who talked to participants in the events that he described. A remarkable and surprisingly readable source that gives us a rare insight into how the participants in these events saw them(Read Full Review)

War Cruel and Sharp: English Strategy under Edward III, Clifford J. Rogers .Looks at the first phase of the Wars of the Roses, to the Peace of Bretigny of 1360, and argues that Edward III's victory was due to a deliberate strategy of seeking battle. Makes a very well argued case, supported by a detailed knowledge of the primary sources, built around a narrative account of Edward's campaigns in Scotland, where he learnt his craft, and in France. [read full review]

Agincourt: Myth and Reality 1415-2015, Stephen Cooper .Looks at a series of the most important issues that surround the battle of Agincourt and attempts to unravel the truth behind them. Aimed at reader with prior knowledge of the battle, this focused approach provides some convincing answers to key questions about the battle. A useful addition to the literature on this well-studied battle. [read full review]

In the Steps of the Black Prince - The Road to Poitiers, 1355-1356, Peter Hoskins. A fascinating attempt to trace the exact route of the Black Prince's raids through France in 1355 and 1356, based on a detailed exploration of the ground and the possible routes, and the linguistic changes in local names. This route evidence is then used to interpret the Prince's motives in both of these raids. [read full review]

The Hundred Years War - An Alternative History of Britain, Timothy Venning. Interesting if rather scattergun look at possible alternative courses of English history during the period of the Hundred Years War, mainly focusing on that war, but also with some attention paid to domestic politics, especially during the weak reign of Richard II and the troubled reign of Henry IV. [read full review]

The Great Chevauchée, John of Gaunt's Raid on France, 1373, David Nicolle. An account of an unsuccessful English raid that crossed France from Calais to Bordeaux, lost one third of its strength and was probably lucky to survive. This is a good account of an important but often neglected incident that played a part in the decline of the English position in France. [read full review]

The Real Falstaff: Sir John Fastolf and the Hundred Years War, Stephen Cooper. Both a biography and a history of the times of Sir John Fastolf, a senior English commander in the later part of the Hundred Years War, and a major landowner in England and France. Made possible by Fastolf's extensive archives and by the Paston letters, this book gives us a fascinating glimpse into Fastolf and his times, from the high-point of Lancastrian France to the loss of everything but Calais. [read full review]

Henry V, Marcus Cowper. A military biography of Henry V, looking at his main campaigns and battles, his opponents, his reputation at the time and since and the primary sources for the events of his reign. Packs a lot of information into its 64 pages, and with the normal high quality selection of pictures and maps. [read full review]

Victory at Poitiers: The Black Prince and the Medieval Art of War, Christian Teutsch. A look at the military career of the Black Prince, focusing on the lessons he could have learnt from his early experiences, especially at Crecy, and how he may have used them to win his great victory at Poitiers. [read full review]

Agincourt 1415 , (campaign series) Matthew Bennett.A good introduction to the battle with several colour plates and some speculative orders of battle. The book contains some example shield designs from both sides which are sadly only in black and white and would have been much better in colour. A detailed section on wargamming the battle is at the end of the book with a novel idea on how to wargame the campaign.

Crecy 1346 : Triumph of the Longbow, Dr David Nicolle, a recent and very good book on the battle


The Hundred Years War: A People's History

The Hundred Years War (1337–1453) dominated life in England and France for well over a century. It became the defining feature of existence for generations. This sweeping book is the first to tell the human story of the longest military conflict in history. Historian David Green focuses on the ways the war affected different groups, among them knights, clerics, women, peas The Hundred Years War (1337–1453) dominated life in England and France for well over a century. It became the defining feature of existence for generations. This sweeping book is the first to tell the human story of the longest military conflict in history. Historian David Green focuses on the ways the war affected different groups, among them knights, clerics, women, peasants, soldiers, peacemakers, and kings. He also explores how the long war altered governance in England and France and reshaped peoples’ perceptions of themselves and of their national character.

Using the events of the war as a narrative thread, Green illuminates the realities of battle and the conditions of those compelled to live in occupied territory the roles played by clergy and their shifting loyalties to king and pope and the influence of the war on developing notions of government, literacy, and education. Peopled with vivid and well-known characters—Henry V, Joan of Arc, Philippe the Good of Burgundy, Edward the Black Prince, John the Blind of Bohemia, and many others—as well as a host of ordinary individuals who were drawn into the struggle, this absorbing book reveals for the first time not only the Hundred Years War’s impact on warfare, institutions, and nations, but also its true human cost. . more


Get A Copy


Judges' Notes on why this book was shortlisted:

This is a superb account of the history of settler colonial conquest of, and indigenous resistance in, Palestine told from the inside and by a distinguished Palestinian historian. This is the best researched history to date of the past century of struggle between the Zionist settler-colonial movement - a movement with its own distinctive characteristics and aspirations and its own Hebrew based nationalism - assisted by great powers such Britain and the United States on the one hand, and the indigenous people of Palestine on the other.


Is There Any Way to End the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict?

When you purchase an independently reviewed book through our site, we earn an affiliate commission.

THE HUNDRED YEARS’ WAR ON PALESTINE
A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017
By Rashid Khalidi

On a morning in early June 1967, Rashid Khalidi was walking down a New York City sidewalk when he came upon a group of people holding an open bedsheet into which passers-by were tossing money. The donations were to aid the state of Israel, then at war with three of its Arab neighbors. What Khalidi found baffling was that, by that morning, the Israelis had already annihilated the air forces of Egypt, Syria and Jordan, and were now using their air supremacy to do the same to those nations’ ground forces. It was the precise outcome that recent American intelligence analyses had predicted should the vastly more powerful Israeli military launch a pre-emptive strike on its adversaries — as Israel had, in fact, done. But this was not at all the story the American public was hearing, as witnessed by the fund-raising on the Manhattan sidewalk. Instead, the 1967 Six-Day War neatly slotted into an ongoing narrative of a tiny Israel besieged by its larger and hateful neighbors, a nation able to survive only through ingenuity and grit.

To Khalidi, the scion of a storied Palestinian family, that sidewalk spectacle was but one more reminder of how thoroughly Israel has been able to control the story line of events in the Middle East over the past century. Wholly marginalized in that story line, he argues, are the Palestinians, their own competing narrative diminished to the point of erasure.

A professor of Arab studies at Columbia University, as well as the author of seven previous books, Khalidi is one of the world’s foremost academic scholars on the topic of Palestinian identity and nationalism. Beyond its provocative title and occasional sharp insight, however, his “Hundred Years’ War on Palestine” feels a rather thin achievement.

Khalidi’s core thesis is that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is best understood as a war of colonial conquest, one that closely hews to the pattern and mind-set of other national-colonial movements of the 19th century. As he points out, an early Zionist slogan calling for a Jewish homeland in Palestine — “a land without people for a people without a land” — not only discounted the presence of the estimated 700,000 Palestinians already there, but echoed a great body of settler lore that required conquered lands to be void of people, or at least inhabited only by lesser ones: Think of the expansion onto Indian lands in the American West, or white Australia’s long denigration of the Aborigines. Zionism had the added advantage, Khalidi argues, of adorning “itself with a biblical coat that was powerfully attractive to Bible-reading Protestants in Great Britain and the United States.”

Consolidating this colonial settler paradigm, in Khalidi’s telling, was the 1948 Israeli War of Independence — or the “Nakba” (Catastrophe), as the Palestinians call it. By seizing control of nearly 80 percent of the land that constituted the British Palestine Mandate, and overseeing the expulsion or flight of a similar percentage of its native Arab population, the Israeli pioneers were emulating the model of earlier victorious settlers. Once outside actors became involved, Khalidi contends, matters only turned worse for the Palestinians. After the 1967 war, for example, the United Nations passed Resolution 242, demanding Israel return to its prewar borders. As Khalidi astutely points out, while SC 242 is generally regarded as the foundational basis for future Arab-Israeli peace talks, for the Palestinians it represented a one-two punch: Nowhere in the resolution are they referred to by name — they are merely “refugees” — while a return to the 1967 borders meant the outside world was now legitimating their 1948 expulsion. In Khalidi’s view, each subsequent diplomatic “breakthrough” in the region has served only to further negate or marginalize the Palestinians. The 1979 Camp David peace treaty between Israel and Egypt meant that the Palestinians had lost a cornerstone ally in the region, while the much-heralded 1993 Oslo Accords served to co-opt the Palestinian leadership and maroon their followers into tiny enclaves under ultimate Israeli control.

While many of Khalidi’s insights are thought-provoking, their persuasiveness is undermined at times by a tendency to shave the rhetorical corner. He quite justifiably labels the Irgun, an early Jewish paramilitary organization, as a “terror group,” but is markedly more charitable when similar tactics were used by armed Palestinian factions. There is also a slipperiness to some of his formulations. To cite one particularly stark example, Khalidi contends that vital to the “settler-colonial enterprise” has been an Israeli campaign to sever the link displaced Palestinians feel for their homeland. “The comforting idea,” he writes, “that ‘the old will die and the young will forget’ — a remark attributed to David Ben-Gurion, probably mistakenly — expresses one of the deepest aspirations of Israeli leaders after 1948.” Well, if the writer himself notes that the source of a quote is probably wrong, then it’s deeply problematic to use that quote.

But the bigger weakness of this book, to my mind, can be distilled to a simple question: Where does it get you? Even if one fully accepts Khalidi’s colonialist thesis, does that move us any closer to some kind of resolution? This may seem an unfair criticism. After all, it is not incumbent on a historian to offer up possible remedies — except this is the closing task Khalidi sets for himself. It is also where his insights become noticeably threadbare.

His most intriguing suggestion is that the Palestinians stop regarding the United States as an honest broker in negotiations with Israel, but recognize that Washington will always ultimately side with Israel. He further suggests that with American influence in the region waning, it might be one of the new powers emerging on the scene — China or India or Russia — that could more honorably fulfill the arbiter role. While Khalidi’s first point has considerable merit, it’s exceedingly hard to see the United States, waning influence or no, ever taking a diplomatic back seat in the region to another external power, or forcing Israel to make the sorts of concessions that a new intermediary would surely demand. And with the possible exception of the current occupant of the White House, it’s even harder to imagine anyone thinking a solution to their problems can be found in the tender embrace of Vladimir Putin.

But there is also a sense that Khalidi has fairly thrown up his hands at this point, that having argued his thesis there’s really not much of anywhere else to go. There are two core reasons for this, both of which he is surely acutely aware.

First, even if the Israel-Palestine conflict is to be viewed through a colonial lens, it no longer fits any colonial precedent. In every other such contest, the settlers came to so outnumber the Indigenous as to make compromise unnecessary (the United States again), or remained so outnumbered by the Indigenous (think the whites of Rhodesia) that compromise was finally inevitable. With the populations of Israel and the extended Palestinian diaspora at near parity, neither formulation applies.

Second, the Palestinians are beset not by one antagonist, but rather by three concentric and interconnected rings of them: Israel the surrounding Arab nations and the political machinations of external powers, most notably the United States. As Khalidi repeatedly points out, over the decades all three of these sets of actors have used the Palestinian issue for their own interests, have teamed up or fallen out in a variety of ways, but almost always to the detriment of the Palestinian people. It is exceedingly difficult to imagine how any part of this dynamic changes in either the near or far term.

In its stead, Khalidi’s notions for an eventual settlement take on an increasingly fantastic quality. In his view, true change will come only when the great inequality between Israelis and Palestinians is recognized, and sufficient numbers of both populations come to accept the right of national existence of the other. To this end, “new negotiations would need to reopen all the crucial issues created by the 1948 war.” One of those key issues, Khalidi concludes, is the so-called “right of return,” the proposal that Palestinians displaced in 1948, together with their offspring, be allowed to return to their original homes. This is an idea that even the most obdurate of Palestinian negotiators privately recognize as fanciful, and if Khalidi truly believes it is a prerequisite to peace, his Hundred Years’ War on Palestine is likely to be an eternal one.


The Hundred Years War

View Inside Format: Cloth
Price: $40.00

What life was like for ordinary French and English people, embroiled in a devastating century-long conflict that changed their world

The Hundred Years War (1337–1453) dominated life in England and France for well over a century. It became the defining feature of existence for generations. This sweeping book is the first to tell the human story of the longest military conflict in history. Historian David Green focuses on the ways the war affected different groups, among them knights, clerics, women, peasants, soldiers, peacemakers, and kings. He also explores how the long war altered governance in England and France and reshaped peoples’ perceptions of themselves and of their national character.

Using the events of the war as a narrative thread, Green illuminates the realities of battle and the conditions of those compelled to live in occupied territory the roles played by clergy and their shifting loyalties to king and pope and the influence of the war on developing notions of government, literacy, and education. Peopled with vivid and well-known characters—Henry V, Joan of Arc, Philippe the Good of Burgundy, Edward the Black Prince, John the Blind of Bohemia, and many others—as well as a host of ordinary individuals who were drawn into the struggle, this absorbing book reveals for the first time not only the Hundred Years War’s impact on warfare, institutions, and nations, but also its true human cost.


What are some good books about the Hundred Years War?

I'm looking for a good book or two about the Hundred Years War and/or about influential people involved. Can anyone recommend some?

It seems like you might be looking for books and/or documentaries. Did you know we have a extensive reading list in our wiki? It covers a wide array of subjects and also includes online documentaries and podcasts. It might be worthwhile to check it out!

If the reading list does not include the material you are looking for, we do hope that someone will be able to make a good suggestion in this thread! If it turns out to be an awesome suggestion, we would love to hear about it so we can include it in the reading list!

I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

It's a damn hard subject to master. What level experience are you with the Middle Ages? Check out the Wikipedia article which is an OK place for an overview and bibliography. For a short survey see Osprey's Essential Histories - 019 - The Hundred Years' War 1337-1453

The problem with THW is it wasn't a war, it was a multi-generational period of on-off conflict in Europe that later historians grouped together since there were some commonalities. The actors come and go, there's no overarching drama to it like say in WWII or Napoleon or Civil War. The drama is within the individual battles, the best books are probably going to be about certain well known battles or people. But it still is useful to know the bigger picture somehow.



The Hundred Years War, Vol IV: Cursed Kings by Jonathan Sumption review – a formidable history

T he hundred years war, fought by England and France from the mid‑14th to mid-15th centuries, is remembered this side of the water for famous English victories such as Crécy and Agincourt, the latter battle being the prize exhibit of this fourth volume of Jonathan Sumption’s majestic multi-tomed history. The French tend to remember the fact that, unlike us, they won, which will be painfully apparent in Sumption’s next book. Here, he covers the years 1399-1422, the reigns of Henry IV and Henry V of England, and in France, most of the reign of Charles VI.

In 1422, Charles made himself useful for once by dying, thus providing Sumption with neatly matching terminal dates for the two sides of his narrative: the French king outlived Henry V by less than a few months. Charles had been on the throne more than 40 years, for most of which he had been pathetically and embarrassingly mad, with just enough intervals of lucidity to make a nuisance of himself. His long-suffering subjects referred euphemistically to his usual state of incapability as his “absences”, and his wretched reign illustrates the fact that history, like nature, abhors a vacuum. Ambitious relatives in the Valois family jostled to rule on Charles’s behalf, and so in the end did Henry V, with miserable results for both kingdoms. Not content that his father had usurped the English throne, Henry’s distinctive brand of self-righteousness impelled him to try an even greater usurpation and create a dual monarchy spanning the Channel. When he died he seemed to have triumphed in this unlikely ambition, but it took the next quarter century for reality to seep into English consciousness, with a little help from Joan of Arc and her supernatural visions (which do not appear in this volume).

Sumption is free from partisan nationalism in telling his story, and that is just as well, because the hundred years war should not be viewed through the increasingly nationalist viewpoints of the 16th to 19th centuries. A much more intricate tussle of identities is apparent, in which those at the top of society thought more in terms of dynasty than of nation. After all, that was the whole point of the war: the Plantagenets were trying to enlarge on their ancient French Angevin inheritance and their tattered remaining territories in the extreme south-west and north-east of France. Their royal heraldry, adopted in the mid-14th century, was the reverse of nationalist, combining the golden lions of England and the golden lilies of France (which actually stood in pride of place on the shield). It was only by dynastic arguments that Henry V could justify his chutzpah in seeking to be heir to the French throne (apart from dealing out that perennial medieval joker in the pack, the will of God).

Matters were different for the humbler subjects of these dynasts, who had other priorities than their masters’ glory, and here something more like modern nationalism might have come into play. The stretch of water between England and France formed one of the most decisive linguistic frontiers in Europe, and language was a potent source of identity. The English nobility and gentry, heirs to William of Normandy’s conquest of England, had once spoken French, but that had changed. One of the interesting threads in Sumption’s account of the endless (and normally fruitless) diplomatic negotiations between the two monarchies is that the English often tried to insist on using the international language of Latin, on the grounds that they didn’t understand French. That was a much less plausible argument than the undoubted fact that hardly anyone in France bothered to learn English, yet English French, or rather Norman French, was becoming obsolete. Jubilant Londoners welcomed Henry V’s victories with banners bearing triumphant slogans in English.

Thus French as a living language in England was in steep decline in the period covered by this volume. Geoffrey Chaucer gently satirised his Prioress in the Canterbury Tales for speaking French “after the school of Stratford atte Bowe”: what he meant was that she had learned archaic Norman-French to understand her nunnery’s Rule of Life, which convents such as St Leonard’s Stratford-at-Bow treasured from their foundations two centuries or so before.

Touchingly, conscientious nuns were still doing this when Henry VIII dissolved their convents generations later. The nuns’ pious custom was a testimony to a lost world of Norman elite civility uniting western Europe, which might have been restored again had Henry V lived longer. On the other hand, it might not. Plantagenet England was a second-rate power beside Valois France in terms of population and financial clout, and only the self-lacerating antics of the Valois dynasty really gave Henries IV and V any chance of French conquests. Most of the time, the two kingdoms’ mutual warfare was as ludicrous and ineffective as a couple of elderly drunks fighting in a pub car park. English armies had one real advantage in their deployment of longbowmen, so effectively demonstrated at Agincourt. It may be symptomatic of the general idiocy of the commanders on the other side that they did not make much serious effort to remedy this imbalance, but maybe they were wise simply to wait for the limits of English resources to kick in.

This is a formidable text of nearly 800 pages, plus endnotes. It could have been written any time in the last hundred years, conceding little to the topics that generally fill lecture timetables in university history departments today. In another sense, however, it is bang up to date: this is Game of Thrones history, with plenty of crazed kings, martial heroes, dastardly betrayals, silky clerical types and prisoners rotting in foul dungeons. A certain sort of teenage boy will devour it obsessively. It is difficult to see that anyone could do this type of history better than Sumption. He has an enviable command of original sources, and an excellent sense of place, very necessary when his geographical canvas extends from Perth to the Pyrenees. He has tramped the squares, back lanes and battlements of France, and he tells you what you might see now when you get off the coach. While the book does not have a single illustration, it offers a generous helping of clear maps and plans by which to follow monarchs brooding on lost provinces, bannered hosts marching o’er hill and dale, and burly archers loosing their deadly showers on the enemy. And we should be grateful to Sumption for sparing us much Tudor spin-doctoring from Shakespeare – no “God for Harry” or similar familiar noises adorn his text. The teenage reader should enjoy the possibly authentic alternative shout from Henry V at Agincourt recorded by one contemporary chronicler: “Fellas, let’s go.” I can see that catching on in the sixth form.


Encyclopedia of the Hundred Years War

Provides clear, concise, and basic descriptions and definitions to over 260 key people, events, and terms relating to the series of conflicts between France and England in the 14th and 15th centuries that later came to be known as the Hundred Years War.

The Encyclopedia of the Hundred Years War provides its users with clear, concise, and basic descriptions and definitions of people, events, and terms relating in some significant way to the series of intermittent conflicts that occurred between France and England in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and that later came to be known collectively as the Hundred Years War. Because this volume focuses exclusively on war itself-what caused it, how it was fought, and what effects it had on the political, social, economic, and cultural life of England and France--it is not a general overview of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century history in either country, but a specialized treatment of the Anglo-French warfare that occurred during those centuries. Entries cover battles, leaders, truces and treaties, military terms and tactics, and sources for the war, including the plays of William Shakespeare, who has long been an important if not always reliable source for information about the people and events of the Hundred Years War.

The Encyclopedia was written primarily for students and other nonspecialists who have an interest-but little background-in this period of European history. Besides providing a highly usable resource for quickly looking up names and terms encountered in reading or during study, the Encyclopedia offers an excellent starting point for classroom or personal research on subjects relating to the course, causes, and consequences of the Hundred Years War. All entries conclude with suggested further readings. A comprehensive bibliography completes the encyclopedia, which is fully indexed.


Watch the video: Ten Minute English and British History #08 - 1066 and the Norman Conquest (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Fenritaur

    I recommend that you visit the website which has many articles on the subject of interest to you.

  2. Geza

    Willingly I accept. The question is interesting, I too will take part in discussion. Together we can come to a right answer.

  3. Wichell

    I think, that you commit an error. Let's discuss it. Write to me in PM.

  4. Arnatt

    I am aware of this situation. One can discuss.

  5. Motilar

    I don't understand what it means?

  6. Seamus

    I understand this question. It is possible to discuss.



Write a message