Category Various

Vienna by Stefan Zweig (1881-1914)
Various

Vienna by Stefan Zweig (1881-1914)

Child of cultural and plural Vienna born in November 1881, from a bourgeois Jewish family, Stefan Zweig very early developed a pronounced taste for reading, a taste which allowed him to acquire a culture as large as it was eclectic, which was furthermore favored by a high-quality Viennese cultural production in both the literary and musical fields.

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Various

Archeology files: The Vikings

In recent decades, there has been a real resurgence of interest in Vikings. Whether it is the Vikings series or the recent exhibition at the castle of the Dukes of Brittany in Nantes, popular success is on the cards. The latest issue of Archaeological Files 391 offers a successful historical and archaeological synthesis of these famous men of the North who fascinate as much as they frightened.
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Various

Napoleon in cartoons (M. Bryant)

His face is a tangle of corpses, his collar a blood-red sea, his jacket a country map where a spider weaves its web as a medal. This caricature is the one that Mark Bryant chose to illustrate his book "Napoleon in caricatures" which completes the collection on this theme with "The First World War in caricatures" and "The Second World War in caricatures".
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Various

The campanile of Saint Mark, symbol of Venice

In the popular imagination, there are buildings that are truly symbols. The Eiffel Tower was thus almost erected as an allegory of the city of Paris. In Venice, the historical and artistic density has contributed, over the centuries, to erect various constructions and to define them as true emblems of the city.
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Various

Black Op - BD

Black Op is hands down the best comic book spy series. Based on a double narration between 1967 and 2004, the complex but fascinating scenario of Stephen Desberg is served by the very expressive drawing by Hugues Labiano which perfectly reproduces, thanks also to the colorization of Jean-Jacques Chagnaud, the atmosphere of the 60s and 2000.
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Various

The Eagle of the Ninth Legion - Film (2011)

Adapted from a successful young novel by British writer Rosemary Sutcliffe, published in 1954, The Eagle of the Ninth Legion takes us on a quest for a Roman centurion and his slave in 2nd century AD England. time. Focusing on human relationships and the beauty of natural settings over raw action, director Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland) delivers an astonishing film that primarily reflects political thinking.
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Various

The spread of Christianity under Charlemagne

Frankish society under Charlemagne saw the spread of a massive phenomenon of Christianization of all the territories placed, directly or indirectly, under its influence. The Dilatatio Regni, that is to say the territorial expansion of the kingdom, is above all a Dilatatio Christianitatis, in other words the Christianization of the whole of society, the diffusion of Christianity in all spheres of society.
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Various

The Fabulous History of the French Flag (R. Delpard)

When a popularization work dealing with colors and symbols opens with a dedication to Michel Pastoureau and intends to refer to his work, we finally say to ourselves maybe hold a quality book on an interesting subject: the history of construction of the French flag. The historian knows, however, that appearances are often deceptive because it is not only a dubious history of the French flag that Raphaël Delpard reveals but also an uncertain national novel.
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Various

Charlemagne's administration and Carolingian law

The Carolingian dynasty spanned more than two centuries, from 751 until the 10th century. Among the kings who compose it, Charlemagne (768-814) laid the foundations for a new administration and internal policy, which will allow him to best control his vast empire. Between auxiliary institutions and new distributions of & 34; roles & 34; the foundations of the modern state are unveiling their first stones.
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Various

The Battle of Charleroi - August 1914 (Baldin / Saint-Fuscien)

In this book, Damien Baldin and Emmanuel Saint-Fulscien, both teachers at EHESS, offer us a study of the battle of Charleroi (August 21-23, 1914), one of the first major Franco-German shocks of the 1st world conflict. and one of the bloodiest. Often relegated to the shadow of the Battle of the Marne that it precedes, the Battle of Charleroi is nonetheless rich in lessons.
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The Ladies' Peace: the Treaty of Cambrai (August 3, 1529)

La Paix des Dames, also called Treaty of Cambrai, ended the Second Italian War. This is the final and happy outcome of a serious situation opposing two enemy cousins: Francis I and Charles V. Only two great ladies could resolve this conflict: Louise of Savoy, mother of the first and Margaret of Austria, the aunt of the second.
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The invention of the sundial (1500 BC)

The invention of the sundial merges with the history of two ancient civilizations, Egypt and Mesopotamia. Taken up later by the Romans and Greeks, this tool was of great use for administrative and especially religious organizations, the latter often punctuating daily activities.
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Various

La table du Titanic, 40 recipes before the iceberg

In the space of 150 minutes, the famous liner Titanic sinks and carries with it the wonders and the symbol of the art of living of the late 19th century! Xavier Manente, passionate about cooking and history, plunges us into this refined and delicate atmosphere, thanks to his book "La Table du Titanic, 40 recipes before the iceberg".
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Various

The conspiracy of the Pazzi (1478)

Within universal history, plots, conspiracies and attacks were numerous, and fueled many controversies, sometimes changing the course of things. The conspiracy of the Pazzi, which took place in Florence in 1478, is a typical example of the failure of a political plot in modern times.
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Various

Metronome, Lorànt Deutsch

A true bestseller in popularized history books, Métronome by Lorànt Deutsch never ceases to be at the head of the gondola in bookstores. And after two print editions - classic and illustrated - it is television's turn to seize the phenomenon with an expensive documentary series coming soon on France 5.
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Various

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) - Biography

Johann Sebastian Bach, a German Baroque organist and master of the art of counterpoint and chorale, is one of the most prolific composers in the history of classical music. Bach's music as a whole goes well beyond the synthesis of stylistic tendencies in baroque music: it is indeed of universal value for all modern Western music.
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Various

Egypt at a crossroads (1920-1930)

Egypt in the 1920s was at a turning point in its history. The latter agree to receive a delegation of opponents, led by Saad Zaghloul: it is the Wafd, which becomes the core of the protest. At the same time, reformist ideas of Abduh, and to a lesser extent Wahhabism, are beginning to infuse the debates of Egyptian Islam.
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Various

Louis XV and Madame de Pompadour (Pierre de Nolhac)

In many minds, Madame de Pompadour has remained an upstart commoner, denigrated and disparaged. Pierre de Nolhac, in his "Louis XV and Madame de Pompadour", offers us a very different portrait of the royal mistress, telling us about her life, proving her intelligence to us, perhaps the self-sacrifice of this courageous woman.
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Various

Sleipnir, the horse of the god Odin (Óđinn)

Sleipnir, "the one who slips", is the steed of the god Óđinn, the Supreme Ase. No other horse is faster than him. He can ride in the air and over the seas.Gestumblindi: Who are the two running, on ten feet, three eyes they have, but only one tail? Come on, now answer this riddle, Heidrek.
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Various

Back to the Bull Run (July - August 1862)

Page 2 sur 2 In the early afternoon, August 29, 1862, the battlefield of Bull Run was surrounded by precarious silence, interrupted by scattered gunfire from skirmishers from both camps and intermittent discharges of cannons regulating their shots. The excessive calm worries and infuriates Pope, who believes Porter and McDowell should already be attacking the southern right wing.
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